5 VALUABLE LESSONS WE CAN LEARN FROM KING SOLOMON’S LIFE

DEVOTIONS

Key Scripture: 1 King 11

King Solomon turned from God and didn’t keep God’s covenant and statutes. In 1 King 11 right from the first verse we learn that Solomon had a love for foreign women ( Foreign women were his weakness and destruction). Solomon disregarded the instructions he was given and clung to these in love. When you read this whole passage you learn many valuable lessons from Solomon’s life choices and the effect they can have, however we have chosen five points to focus on.

Lesson One: God is a loving God, but He is also a Just God.

We learn in verse 9 – 13 that God can tear apart if he is displeased but not without warning.

What destruction’s have taken you away from the love of God?

Is it social media, women, men or even work. Identify what is destructing and deviating you from God. What ever it is, it is an enemy of what God wants to do in your life. God has a headlining show for us, but many of us are busy side-tracked by sideshows like Solomon was.

 

Lesson Two: Introspection is very Important.

How could the wisest King miss it? If the wisest king could miss it, anyone can miss it. We can all start well but not finish well like it happened to Solomon. Introspection is very vital as it helps us to pay attention to patterns and realise where things are going wrong. God tried to bring Solomon back, tried to get his attention by raising storms (enemies) against him. You would think after all those adversaries God raised against Solomon, that maybe he would get the memo (wake up call), but NO.

God wants you back, so what sideshow has taken you off course?

 

Lesson Three: God has given you all Necessary tools in life

God has given us all necessary tools in life so that we do not have to go searching for destruction’s that deviate us from His original plan for our lives. The wisest king and one of the greatest writers ended badly with no account in the bible of finishing well and receiving a crown. What does it profit a man to gain the whole world and yet lose his soul? Don’t get this wrong. There is nothing wrong with having good things in life, but if chasing the world has become our priority in the process becoming self consumed and absorbed and we have forgotten the author and finisher of it all, then something is clearly wrong. God has already given us every necessary tool so that we don’t go looking for resources or validation in all the wrong places. Solomon forgot all this and deviated from Gods plan for his life.

 

Lesson Four: Pursuit of own Pleasure leads to Destruction

In Jeremiah 29:11, God never said “I know the plans you have for yourselves..” It says; “For I know the plans I have for you.” I want to link this to Solomon’s fall because its a very valuable lesson. Solomon forgot the plans God had for him and became in pursuit of his own pleasure (Solomon explored all pleasure) and lost himself. Had he stuck to the assurance of Gods plan for his life then Gods ‘plans to prosper him and not to harm him; plans to give him a hope and a future.’ Would have been a continuous manifestation in his life. He stopped doing what God wanted him to do and also stopped being all that God has appointed and anointed him to be (all because of seeking self pleasure).

 

Lesson Five: Die Empty but Don’t end up Empty

One of the things we learn about King Solomon is that he ended up empty. Imagine just existing and not living out purpose. Solomon grew weary and recognised he was empty and Gods presence not there.  There is a difference in dying empty (living out Gods plan and purpose for your life and fulfilling it) as compared to ending up empty (whereby you’ve been out and about and everywhere but have not lived a life of Gods purpose). What a horrible way to end. You have to aim to die empty but yet so full of his presence rather than ending up empty and weary.

I hope you were blessed by this and feel free to share lessons you have taken away from reading and studying about King Solomon.

I’m a christian and I’m proud

Image Credit: Single Focus

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